Courses

Grade 9: Principles of Mathematics (MPM1D)

This course enables students to develop an understanding of mathematical concepts related to algebra, analytic geometry, and measurement and geometry through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will investigate relationships, which they will then generalize as equations of lines, and will determine the connections between different representations of a linear relation. They will also explore relationships that emerge from the measurement of three-dimensional figures and two-dimensional shapes. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

Overall Curriculum Expectations

By the end of this course, students will: 

  • demonstrate an understanding of the exponent rules of multiplication and division, and apply them to simplify expressions;
  • manipulate numerical and polynomial expressions, and solve first-degree equations.
  • apply data-management techniques to investigate relationships between two variables; 
  • demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics of a linear relation; 
  • connect various representations of a linear relation.
  • determine the relationship between the form of an equation and the shape of its graph with respect to linearity and non-linearity; 
  • determine, through investigation, the properties of the slope and y-intercept of a linear relation; 
  • solve problems involving linear relations

Grade 10: Principles of Mathematics (MPM2D)

This course enables students to broaden their understanding of relationships and extend their problem-solving and algebraic skills through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will explore quadratic relations and their applications; solve and apply linear systems; verify properties of geometric figures using analytic geometry; and investigate the trigonometry of right and acute triangles. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. 

Prerequisite: Grade 9 Mathematics, Academic, or Grade 9 Mathematics Transfer, Applied to Academic

Overall Curriculum Expectations:

By the end of this course, students will: 

  • determine the basic properties of quadratic relations; 
  • relate transformations of the graph of y = x2 to the algebraic representation y = a(x – h) 2 + k; 
  • solve quadratic equations and interpret the solutions with respect to the corresponding relations; 
  • solve problems involving quadratic relations.
  • model and solve problems involving the intersection of two straight lines;
  • solve problems using analytic geometry involving properties of lines and line segments; 
  • verify geometric properties of triangles and quadrilaterals, using analytic geometry.
  • use their knowledge of ratio and proportion to investigate similar triangles and solve problems related to similarity; • solve problems involving right triangles, using the primary trigonometric ratios and the Pythagorean theorem; 
  • solve problems involving acute triangles, using the sine law and the cosine law.

Grade 11: Functions

This course introduces the mathematical concept of the function by extending students’ experiences with linear and quadratic relations. Students will investigate properties of discrete and continuous functions, including trigonometric and exponential functions; represent functions numerically, algebraically, and graphically; solve problems involving applications of functions; investigate inverse functions; and develop facility in determining equivalent algebraic expressions. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. 

Overall Curriculum Expectations:

By the end of this course, students will:

  • demonstrate an understanding of functions, their representations, and their inverses, and make connections between the algebraic and graphical representations of functions using transformations;
  • determine the zeros and the maximum or minimum of a quadratic function, and solve problems involving quadratic functions, including problems arising from real-world applications;
  • demonstrate an understanding of equivalence as it relates to simplifying polynomial, radical, and rational expressions.
  • evaluate powers with rational exponents, simplify expressions containing exponents, and describe properties of exponential functions represented in a variety of ways; 
  • make connections between the numeric, graphical, and algebraic representations of exponential functions; 
  • identify and represent exponential functions, and solve problems involving exponential functions, including problems arising from real-world applications.
  • demonstrate an understanding of recursive sequences, represent recursive sequences in a variety of ways, and make connections to Pascal’s triangle;
  • demonstrate an understanding of the relationships involved in arithmetic and geometric sequences and series, and solve related problems;
  • make connections between sequences, series, and financial applications, and solve problems involving compound interest and ordinary annuities.
  • determine the values of the trigonometric ratios for angles less than 360º; prove simple trigonometric identities; and solve problems using the primary trigonometric ratios, the sine law, and the cosine law;
  • demonstrate an understanding of periodic relationships and sinusoidal functions, and make connections between the numeric, graphical, and algebraic representations of sinusoidal functions;
  • identify and represent sinusoidal functions, and solve problems involving sinusoidal functions, including problems arising from real-world applications.

Grade 12: Advanced Functions

This course extends students’ experience with functions. Students will investigate the properties of polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; develop techniques for combining functions; broaden their understanding of rates of change; and develop facility in applying these concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended both for students taking the Calculus and Vectors course as a prerequisite for a university program and for those wishing to consolidate their understanding of mathematics before proceeding to any one of a variety of university programs.

Overall Course Expectations:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between exponential expressions and logarithmic expressions, evaluate logarithms, and apply the laws of logarithms to simplify numeric expressions; 
  • identify and describe some key features of the graphs of logarithmic functions, make connections among the numeric, graphical, and algebraic representations of logarithmic functions, and solve related problems graphically; 
  • solve exponential and simple logarithmic equations in one variable algebraically, including those in problems arising from real-world applications.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the meaning and application of radian measure; 
  • make connections between trigonometric ratios and the graphical and algebraic representations of the corresponding trigonometric functions and between trigonometric functions and their reciprocals, and use these connections to solve problems; 
  • solve problems involving trigonometric equations and prove trigonometric identities
  • identify and describe some key features of polynomial functions, and make connections between the numeric, graphical, and algebraic representations of polynomial functions; 
  • identify and describe some key features of the graphs of rational functions, and represent rational functions graphically;
  • solve problems involving polynomial and simple rational equations graphically and algebraically; 
  • demonstrate an understanding of solving polynomial and simple rational inequalities.
  • demonstrate an understanding of average and instantaneous rate of change, and determine, numerically and graphically, and interpret the average rate of change of a function over a given interval and the instantaneous rate of change of a function at a given point;
  • determine functions that result from the addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of two functions and from the composition of two functions, describe some properties of the resulting functions, and solve related problems; 
  • compare the characteristics of functions, and solve problems by modeling and reasoning with functions, including problems with solutions that are not accessible by standard algebraic techniques.

Grade 12: Calculus and Vectors

This course builds on students’ previous experience with functions and their developing understanding of rates of change. Students will solve problems involving geometric and algebraic representations of vectors and representations of lines and planes in three-dimensional space; broaden their understanding of rates of change to include the derivatives of polynomial, sinusoidal, exponential, rational, and radical functions; and apply these concepts and skills to the modelling of real-world relationships. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended for students who choose to pursue careers in fields such as science, engineering, economics, and some areas of business, including those students who will be required to take a university-level calculus, linear algebra, or physics course.

Overall Course Expectations:

By the end of this course, students will: 

  • demonstrate an understanding of rate of change by making connections between average rate of change over an interval and instantaneous rate of change at a point, using the slopes of secants and tangents and the concept of the limit; 
  • graph the derivatives of polynomial, sinusoidal, and exponential functions, and make connections between the numeric, graphical, and algebraic representations of a function and its derivative; 
  • verify graphically and algebraically the rules for determining derivatives; apply these rules to determine the derivatives of polynomial, sinusoidal, exponential, rational, and radical functions, and simple combinations of functions; and solve related problems.
  • make connections, graphically and algebraically, between the key features of a function and its first and second derivatives, and use the connections in curve sketching; 
  • solve problems, including optimization problems, that require the use of the concepts and procedures associated with the derivative, including problems arising from real-world applications and involving the development of mathematical models.
  • demonstrate an understanding of vectors in two-space and three-space by representing them algebraically and geometrically and by recognizing their applications;
  • perform operations on vectors in two-space and three-space, and use the properties of these operations to solve problems, including those arising from real-world applications;
  • distinguish between the geometric representations of a single linear equation or a system of two linear equations in two-space and three-space, and determine different geometric configurations of lines and planes in three-space; 
  • represent lines and planes using scalar, vector, and parametric equations, and solve problems involving distances and intersections

Grade 12: Mathematics of Data Management

This course broadens students’ understanding of mathematics as it relates to managing data. Students will apply methods for organizing and analysing large amounts of information; solve problems involving probability and statistics; and carry out a culminating investigation that integrates statistical concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. Students planning to enter university programs in business, the social sciences, and the humanities will find this course of particular interest.

Overall Course Expectations:

By the end of this course, students will: 

  • solve problems involving the probability of an event or a combination of events for discrete sample spaces; 
  • solve problems involving the application of permutations and combinations to determine the probability of an event.
  • demonstrate an understanding of discrete probability distributions, represent them numerically, graphically, and algebraically, determine expected values, and solve related problems from a variety of applications; 
  • demonstrate an understanding of continuous probability distributions, make connections to discrete probability distributions, determine standard deviations, describe key features of the normal distribution, and solve related problems from a variety of applications.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the role of data in statistical studies and the variability inherent in data, and distinguish different types of data; 
  • describe the characteristics of a good sample, some sampling techniques, and principles of primary data collection, and collect and organize data to solve a problem.
  • analyse, interpret, and draw conclusions from one-variable data using numerical and graphical summaries; 
  • analyse, interpret, and draw conclusions from two-variable data using numerical, graphical, and algebraic summaries; 
  • demonstrate an understanding of the applications of data management used by the media and the advertising industry and in various occupations.
  • design and carry out a culminating investigation that requires the integration and application of the knowledge and skills related to the expectations of this course;
  • communicate the findings of a culminating investigation and provide constructive critiques of the investigations of others.